Creamsicle Gelatin Cups Recipe (2024)

Creamsicle Gelatin Cups Recipe (1)

Do you love the flavor of the creamsicle push-up pops we grew up with but not the corn syrup,dextrose, polysorbate 80 and other questionable ingredients they contain? These gelatin cups are a yummy way to getthe benefits of gelatininto your diet with all of its protein and amino acids for repairing your skin, hair, and nails… not to mention your digestive system.

And of course, they deliver creamsicle deliciousness . . . only in a more portable and less “drip all over your fingers” form. (Which, hey, I’m all for in the summer when I can send my kids outside to eat and hose them off if needed.)

How to Make Real-Food Creamsicle Gelatin Cups

These cups contain 5 — yes just 5 – ingredients: orange juice, vanilla, grass-fed gelatin, fresh cream or coconut milk/cream, and a touch of maple syrup or honey.

Set in layers in small mason jars, they’re a great option when we’re in the mood for a light, fruity dessert and it’s not hot enough forhomemade popsicles.

The bottom layer is a mixture of fresh squeezed orange juice, gelatin, and a little honey and vanilla extract. You’ll need unflavored gelatin, which you can buy from a good, pasture raised source here. Just make sure you use the gelatin, not the collagen peptides that won’t gel.

Once the orange layer is made, it will need to chill for a while until firm. The process for making the top vanilla cream layer is exactly the same as the orange layer, just with cream instead of orange juice. Again, it will need to chill before being eaten.

These jello cups take only minutes to make but about 4 hours total to firm up in the fridge, so plan ahead.

I used these 5 ounce jars to make 7 snack cups. These 4 ounce jelly jars also work well, especially if you want to take them on the go. Of course, small glasses, pyrex bowls, or a large glass pan will work, too – just cut the jello into squares when it’s chilled.

This recipe is designed after the pre-made gelatin cups you can buy from the store – except made with real food ingredients. I made these in small glass storage containers that come with fitted lids which makes this recipe easy for grab-and-go, lunches, or afternoon snacks. It is creamy, smooth, flavorful, and is kid and husband approved!

Creamsicle Gelatin Cups Recipe (2)

Tip: Save Your Orange Peels!

There’s a quick way to turn your leftover peels into an inexpensive, all-purpose cleaning vinegar that’s perfect for kitchens and bathrooms, removing buildup and grime, and more.

Here’s how to make citrus-infused cleaning vinegar.

Creamsicle Gelatin Cups Recipe

These gelatin cups are made with fresh squeezed orange juice and heavy cream for flavors reminiscent of creamsicles.

Course Dessert

Cuisine American

Prep Time 15 minutes minutes

Cook Time 10 minutes minutes

Total Time 4 hours hours 25 minutes minutes

Servings 7 4 oz. cups

Calories 169kcal

Author Heather Dessinger

Ingredients

Orange Layer

Cream Layer

Instructions

To Make The Orange Layer

  • In a small bowl mix together 1/2 cup orange juice and 7 teaspoons gelatin.Set aside.

  • In a small saucepan combine the rest of the orange juice with 2 tablespoons honey and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract.

  • Heat over medium-low heat until the mixture is hot but not boiling.

  • Whisk in the gelatin mixture until completely it is dissolved. Taste and add more honey if needed.

  • Divide evenly between ramekins or mason jelly jars. I placed 1/3 cup in seven of these jars.

  • Place containers in the fridge for a couple of hours to firm up. Once the orange layer is firm it's time to make the cream layer.

To Make The Cream Layer

  • In a small bowl mix together 1/3 cup cream and 1 tablespoon gelatin.Set aside.

  • In a small saucepan combine the rest of the cream with 4 teaspoons honey and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract.

  • Heat over medium-low heat until the mixture is hot but not boiling.

  • Whisk in the gelatin mixture until completely it is dissolved. Taste and add more honey if needed.

  • Divide evenly between ramekins or mason jelly jars. I placed just a little over 2 tablespoons into seven of these jars.

  • Place back in the fridge and allow the cream layer to firm up for another hour or two before serving.

Notes

Feel free to use whatever size ramekins you’d like. I find that 4 oz jelly jars make a nice size serving, come with handy lids, and are easy to transport.

Creamsicle Gelatin Cups Recipe (4)Tried this recipe?

Mention @mommypotamus or tag #mommypotamus!

Nutrition

Serving: 4oz. | Calories: 169kcal | Carbohydrates: 11g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 11g | Sodium: 15mg | Potassium: 111mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 6mg | Iron: 1mg

More Healthy Gelatin Snacks

Homemade Strawberry Jello Recipe – If you love strawberry jello but not the congealed red #40 and artificial flavorings found in boxed versions, you’re going to love this recipe!

Sour Gummy Snacks – These yummy gummies only take five-minutes of hands-on time to make and are perfect for snacking on-the-go.

Strawberry Cream Gummy Snacks – If you already love the flavor of oranges and cream, chances are you’ll love this recipe, too!

Easy Coconut Panna Cotta – This four-ingredient recipe from Megan of Detoxinista is super easy and delicious.

Want more delicious, easy recipes?

No problem, I’ve created a free ebook for you –35+ Gluten-Free Desserts – as a gift for signing up for my newsletter. Every Sunday you’ll get recipes, actionable health tips, and highly-vetted product recommendations delivered fresh to your inbox.

Sign up using the form below.

Creamsicle Gelatin Cups Recipe (5)

Related Posts

  • Bacon and Egg Breakfast Cups

  • Salted Chocolate Almond Butter Cups

  • Broccoli Salad Recipe - Veggies Your Kids Will Actually Eat

Share with a friend! 👇

Share on X (Twitter)Share on FacebookShare on PinterestShare on EmailShare on Telegram
Creamsicle Gelatin Cups Recipe (2024)

FAQs

How much gelatin per cup of liquid? ›

The Right Amount of Gelatin to Use

Soft Set: Use 1 teaspoon of unflavored powdered gelatin for 1 cup of liquid. Medium Set: Use 2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin for 1 cup of liquid. Firm Set: Use 1 tablespoon of unflavored powdered gelatin for 1 cup of liquid.

What is the ratio of gelatin to water? ›

As a general rule of thumb, David Lebovitz outlines the gelatin to liquid ratio in this blog post: “1 envelope of gelatin will firmly set 2 cups of liquid, enough to unmold a dessert. 1 envelope of gelatin will softly set 3 cups of liquid. You will not be able to unmold this type of dessert.”

What are the ingredients for gelatin? ›

Gelatin is made from animal collagen — a protein that makes up connective tissues, such as skin, tendons, ligaments, and bones. The hides and bones of certain animals — often cows and pigs — are boiled, dried, treated with a strong acid or base, and finally filtered until the collagen is extracted.

What are the measurements for Jell-O? ›

Whisk together 1 cup (240 milliliters) of hot water with 1 packet of jello in a large bowl. Keep whisking until no powdery granules remain, about 2 to 3 minutes. If you are using a larger, 6-ounce (170 grams) packet of jello, use 2 cups (475 milliliters) of hot water instead.

How do you calculate how much gelatin to use? ›

Four sheets of gelatin equal about one packet, so each sheet is around 1.8 grams. If you are using a recipe that calls for 2% powdered gelatin, you can figure out the number of sheets you need to use for every 100 grams of liquid by dividing the percent by 1.8.

How much gelatin for 4 cups? ›

Most unflavoured gelatine is packaged in pre-measured individual envelopes for convenient usage. Each envelope of Knox� Unflavoured Gelatine will gel 2 cups of liquid. If the recipe you want to use calls for unflavoured gelatine by the tablespoon, just use 1 envelope for each tablespoon called for.

How much gelatin does it take to thicken liquid? ›

For a light thickening effect, use one teaspoon of gelatin per cup of liquid. For a firmer result, increase the amount of gelatin. To avoid clumping, always mix the gelatin with a small amount of liquid before adding it to the recipe.

What happens if you add too much gelatin? ›

Too much gelatin can result in a rubbery texture, while too little gelatin can lead to a dessert that won't hold its shape. It's important to follow the specified measurements in the recipe and avoid any guesswork.

How do you mix gelatin with water? ›

Soak or dissolve

To soak gelatin powder slowly pour the gelatin into the water so that it spreads throughout. Pouring water into gelatin powder is more likely to generate lumps and leave some gelatin undissolved. To dissolve gelatin powder, place over a warm water bath or pour into warmed liquid.

What ingredients should not be added to gelatin? ›

Proteases are enzymes that break chemical bonds in proteins, such as collagen in gelatin. Pineapple, kiwi, papaya, mango, and guava are examples of fruits that cause a problem. Heat inactivates proteases, so cooking fruit before adding it to gelatin prevents any issue.

What's the difference between gelatin and gelatine? ›

Gelatin vs Gelatine

The only difference between “gelatin” and “gelatine” is the spelling, as the two versions mean the same thing. Other names for gelatin include: hydrolyzed collagen, hydrolyzed gelatine, and gelatine or collagen hydrolysate.

What will prevent gelatin from thickening? ›

Fresh figs, kiwi fruit, papaya, pineapple and prickly pears contain protease enzymes (enzymes which destroy protein). These enzymes have a softening effect on gelatine and prevent it from gelling properly.

What is the ratio of water to gelatin in jello? ›

Use 1 envelope (1 tablespoon or 1/4 ounce) unflavored gelatin to 2 cups of water for standard firmness.

What are the side effects of taking gelatin? ›

When taken by mouth: Gelatin is commonly consumed in foods. It is possibly safe when used in larger amounts as medicine, short-term. But taking high doses of 15 grams daily might increase the risk for side effects, including sore throat, swollen gums, and mouth sores. Gelatin comes from animals.

How much water for 3 ounces of jello? ›

Basic Directions for a 3-Ounce Package

Stir 1 cup boiling water into gelatin in a medium bowl for at least 2 minutes until completely set. Stir in 1 cup cold water. Refrigerate 4 hours or until firm.

How much gelatin per cup of broth? ›

We found that 2 teaspoons of gelatin per cup of broth thickens sauces and braises appropriately, while 1 teaspoon per cup is best for dishes with a larger amount of broth, such as soups.

What is the ratio of gelatin to liquid for gummies? ›

The basic ratio is 1 TBSP gelatin : 100ml liquid.

Can you use too much gelatin? ›

When taken by mouth: Gelatin is commonly consumed in foods. It is possibly safe when used in larger amounts as medicine, short-term. But taking high doses of 15 grams daily might increase the risk for side effects, including sore throat, swollen gums, and mouth sores.

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Kerri Lueilwitz

Last Updated:

Views: 6384

Rating: 4.7 / 5 (67 voted)

Reviews: 90% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Kerri Lueilwitz

Birthday: 1992-10-31

Address: Suite 878 3699 Chantelle Roads, Colebury, NC 68599

Phone: +6111989609516

Job: Chief Farming Manager

Hobby: Mycology, Stone skipping, Dowsing, Whittling, Taxidermy, Sand art, Roller skating

Introduction: My name is Kerri Lueilwitz, I am a courageous, gentle, quaint, thankful, outstanding, brave, vast person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.